Font pairings for Squarespace - Part 1

 

One of the many reasons we love working with Squarespace is the built-in connection to Google Fonts,  giving us a huge range of typographical combinations for our designs.

Beginners to Squarespace however may not know that not every font option comes up when you click the typography option in the style editor. There are many lesser known google fonts so we're making it our mission in this series of posts to shine some light on those fonts and give you some suggestions for great font pairings for Squarespace.

You can view more inspiration on our pinterest board.

 
Bentham is inspired by the lettering of nineteenth-century maps, gravestones and the maker’s plates of cast-iron machinery.
— Ben Weiner / designer

Bentham is definitely a new favourite of ours here at Lift. It's decorative, yet subtle and we find it works well for us when used for smaller headlines, eg. h3 tags, with a stronger bolder sans-serif headline. In the above instance we are combining it with Hind which is a great headline font and also a new discovery of ours.


Huerta Tipográfica is a collaborative Argentinian type foundry with a deep respect for design and typography.
— Huerta Tipográfica / Google fonts

Bitter is an originally Argentinian font which we've loved for a while now for headings with imapact yet still elegant. Arimo is a font we're starting to use a little more occasionally, we love the combination of curves and rectangles.


This is a combo we were using before we realised these came from the same designer, Vernon Adams. These fonts work in a more playful layout. We original worked using Rokkitt just as a headline, h3, font, but we've found it also actually works pretty nicely for body copy, or if you want to call out a quote block / testimonial and make this stand out from the body copy.


A diploma thesis project from the Aachen University of Applied Sciences at Karl-Friedrich (Kai) Oetzbach. The design was initiated in a course on type design, and the idea was to learn about writing as an information carrier by creating a typeface.
— Thomas Junold
 
 
Designsarah longworth